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Edward Huner

Huner, Edward (BFA, SCA) took his formal fine art training as a conceptual artist at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax. He has been exhibiting his figurative paintings in both private and public galleries since 1978. Ed has been an instructor of fine art studio programs at universities in Nova Scotia and with the New Brunswick Community College System. His work is represented in the permanent collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, The Nova Scotia Art Bank Collection as well as private and corporate collections. Ed Huner is an elected member of the Society of Canadian Artists. He resides with his wife Barbara in the coastal community of Musquodoboit Harbour at Martinique Beach, Nova Scotia.

 

General Statement of Creative Intent:

"I like to think I paint ideas rather than things. And I like to think that I am really painting the spaces between shapes rather than the objects themselves. My spatial interests harkens back to a pre-renaissance era when pictorial narrative took precedent over uniformity of scale, proportion, lighting and perspective.

My interest in representational imagery lies between perception and recognition. I arbitrate among disparate ideas into sharing fixed spaces and visual relationships. I search for a fulcrum, perhaps a point of paradox, between that which s united and understood and that which is divided and misunderstood – points of observation and expectation. The narratives are inconclusive.

The choice of my imagery may seem incongruent, but then my metaphors are personal and therefore allusive. The success of my images is not based not on an interpretation of my insistence but rather I hope, based on the viewers’ wishes. I trust the viewer will bring their own life experiences to my metaphors and collaborate in a co-creation that expands, transforms and intensifies the visual experience beyond the elements I have provided. In effect to supply what is not there. Thus for each viewer, their narrative interpretation will uniquely and meaningfully be theirs to possess.

The realism that I’m after is the tension between selection and truth – what it is and what it pretends to be. In terms of what my process is and what it is not, I can suggest that my choices are selective rather than inclusive; indefinite rather than precise and provocative rather than explanatory."